Sentences and phrases for descriptive and narrative essays

Instead I believe we should use past simple in first example and future simple in second. Correct me if I'm wrong. Hello JamlMakav, With regard to your second question, it's often possible to use simpler verb forms, as you suggest. For example, you could say 'I had breakfast before I went to school' and 'I'll take my exam before you come home'. For that, you should seek a teacher. Sentences and phrases for descriptive and narrative essays. Is there any way to omit a determiner before a noun and not to make a mistake? ''Living in the UK has given me an opportunity to develop my skills''Could I omit indirect object if my it's clear that it gave ME opportunity not to somebody else. Are there rules of using ellipsis or it's just a matter of style and wanted purpose? If this question is too wide, then I just want to know if it's used in formal English frequently. Thank you for help. Hello JamlMakav, In your sentence about programming, I'd probably use the plural in one spot ('many see computers as a simple everyday device') instead of the indefinite article, but otherwise it sounds good. Is this grammatically correct? Hello JakiGeh, In informal speaking and in some dialects, it's sometimes possible to use a singular verb with a plural subject.

My approach changed as soon as I found. ''
I don't want to repeat ''I'', so I have the choices:
If I used ''Having had'', would it mean ''didn't have understanding until my approach changed? '' Maybe it's better to use ''Having'' because everything is clear anyway? After since ''Since (having had)/having no understanding of. ''Thank you again. Hello JamlMakav, Thanks for explaining that - I wasn't sure where you wanted to use 'having had', but now I see that you mean at the beginning of the second sentence. If this year's is 4000, how much WAS last year's sales? '' or ''We WAS lucky''''I saw phones as A SIMPLE DEVICE'' Why not ''phones as simple devices? ''''It's known that the missing number squared, plus 6 times the missing number, equals -8''Could the first comma be substituting for ''and? '' But I still don't understand why the last comma is used and it doesn't seem like a list either. ''If the average weight of a cow is 1500 pounds and produces 10 gallons of milk. ''Is pronoun ''it'' omitted before produces? Is it still possible to do that in this case? ''I believe that to be a part of your university will make me a more valuable student that is aiming high. ''What would be the difference between the two sentences, if I changed present continuous into simple? Hello MCWSL, The rule about having the same subject applies to participle clauses, not to all subordinate clauses. It would be grammatically incorrect to use 'having had' after 'since', as 'since' (when used as to express reason) is followed by a complete clause, i. e. If you need help finding one, you might want to consider contacting the. All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team''At the beginning of the secondary school, I did not pay much attention to education. For example, ''I'll have taken my exam before you come home'' future perfect isn't necessary here since it's clear what goes first. I wouldn't recommend you speak or write this way, since as a non-native speaker people will probably think your grammar is bad rather than thinking that you're using a dialect. The mathematics sentence wouldn't make sense to me if you replaced the first comma with 'and'.

With subject and verb. But a can be used to express reason, so you could simply say 'Having no understanding of it, I did not have. ' and it would say what it seems you want to say. However, in this particular context there is little difference, I would say, and you can use either form. ''When starting programming classes, I was astonished by the Mathematics application in a computer and even though many see a computer as a simple everyday device, being creative and skillful mathematically, I understood that if used properly, it is a tool to. ''I repeat ''a'' very often. It's also possible to say 'Having had no understanding. ', but 'Having' is better here since you're not speaking of a concrete action but rather a mental state. I hope this helps. All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team''Statements state that order is not relevant when performing addition''I've read that we can reduce a subordinate clause if the subject is the same in a main clause. Since I had no understanding of it, I did not have a special interest in curricula. For example I found these, ''This year's house sales will be a half as much as last year's. The basic unit of English grammar is the clause : Clauses are made up of phrases : We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences . Can a plural noun take a singular verb? But the option is available. As for your first question, could you please write out the alternative version that you're asking about - I'm afraid what you're suggesting is not completely clear to me. All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish TeamHello Kirk, I am sorry for this. ''At the beginning of the secondary school, I did not pay much attention to education.

There are various types of clause which can be reduced and not all are participle clauses (or participle phrases, as they are also called). With regard to your second question, I would say that generally the continuous form suggests a temporary state, while the simple form suggests something more permanent. In this sentence, subjects are different. Occasionally this means we answer questions that are not closely related to a page on our website, but we're not able to provide the service of answering any and all questions that our users have. My approach changed as soon as I found. ''I don't want to repeat ''I'', so I have the choices:
If I used ''Having had'', would it mean ''didn't have understanding until my approach changed? '' Maybe it's better to use ''Having'' because everything is clear anyway? ''I'd had breakfast before I went to school''Is using of past perfect required with time expressions when it's clear what goes first? What's the purpose of this? In this case, I'd say the commas indicate a series of operations. Yes, the sentence is not grammatically correct without 'it'. We're happy to help you with questions, but please remember that our main purpose is to help our users get the most out of our site. If you used the other forms, you would be putting emphasis on the sequence, but as you suggest, this is not always necessary. I'm afraid your question (if there's any way to omit a determiner and not make a mistake) is a very difficult one to answer as there are so many possible situations to consider. As for your second question, it would sound unnatural to omit 'me' in a phrase like that one.